Thursday, December 15, 2011

How important are sensory details? Part 3....TASTE cont'd

Sensory details can make the difference between reading a story and experiencing it. Using the correct identifier for descriptions, can make words burst off the pages.

This post is divided into five parts, allowing each of the senses to take center stage.
In my humble opinion, the key to using the below listed words, is to use them in a way in which you do NOT describe their anticipated counterpart.

TASTE- FEEL

abrasive, airy
bubbly, bumpy
chalky, chewy, chunky, cold, cool, cottony, creamy, crispy, crunchy, curdled
delicate, dusty, dry
fizzy, fluffy
gooey, grainy, gritty, greasy
harsh, heavy, hot
icy
jelly, juicy
light, liquid
moist, mousse, mushy
oily
pointed, powdery, prickly, pulpy
rich, rigid, rough
silky, slimy, smooth, soft, sticky
tender, textured, thick
velvety
wet

Saturday, December 10, 2011

How important are sensory details? Part 3....TASTE


TASTE
Sensory details can make the difference between reading a story and experiencing it. Using the correct identifier for descriptions, can make words burst off the pages.

This post is divided into five parts, allowing each of the senses to take center stage.
In my humble opinion, the key to using the below listed words, is to use them in a way in which you do NOT describe their anticipated counterpart.

Taste flavor-

-acidic, almond, apple, apricot
-banana, barbeque, beef, bitter, bittersweet, bland, blackberry, blueberry, briny, brown sugar, bubble gum, burnt, butterscotch, buttery
-caramel, cashew, celery, charred, cheddar, cheesecake, cheesy, cherry, chicken, chipotle, chives, chocolate, coconut, cinnamon, citrisy, clean, cranberry, crisp, cucumber, curry, custard
-dill, dirt
-earthy
-fiery, fishy, flavorless, french vanilla, fruity
-gamy, garlic, gingery, grape, grapefruit, green pepper
-ham, hazelnut, hickory, honey
-keylime, kiwi
-lemon, lime, licorice
-mango, medicinal, melon, minty, mushroom, mustard, musty
-nutty
-oat, olive, onion, orange, oregano,
-parmesan, parsley, peacan, peach, peanut butter, pear, pepper, pepperjack, peppermint, perfume, pineapple, plum, pomegranate
-raspberry, raw, rosemary
-sage, salty, sauer kraut, savory, seafood, sharp, skunky, smoky, sour, spearmint, spicy, strawberry, sugary, sweet, syrupy
-tangy, tasteless, terriaki, thyme, tomato, tuna, turkey
-unseasoned
-vanillla, vinegary
-walnut, watermelon, wheat, white chocolate, whole grain
-yolky
-zesty


Resources include:

http://www.formeofcury.com/

http://thesaurus.com/

Sunday, November 13, 2011

How important are sensory details? Part 2...SMELL

SMELL

While descriptions of any kind will most likely be a phrase, below is a list of some of the most distinct and relatable one word scents/smells I can think of:
-acid, aloe, ammonia, apple,
-banana, basil, bleach, blueberry, bubble gum, butterscotch, butter
-caramel, cheesecake, cherry, chocolate, cinnamon, citronella, citrus, coconut, coffee, copper, cranberry, cucumber
-detergent, dill, dusty
-earthy, eucalyptus
-feet, fishy, floral, flour
-garlic, gasoline, ginger, glue, grapefruit, grease
-hemp, hickory, honey, honeysuckle, hot
-jalapeƱo, jasmine
-kerosene
-lavender, leather, lemon, licorice, lilac, lime, linen
-maple, medicinal, metallic, mildew, molasses, moldy, musky, musty
-nutmeg
-odorless, oil, onion, orange, oregano, orchid
-papaya, parsley, peachy, pepper, peppermint, perspiration, pine, pineapple, perfume, plastic, pomegranate, potpurri, pumpkin
-raspberry, rope, rose, rosemary, rubber
-sage, salty, savory, sewage, skunk, smoky, soapy, sour, stale, sweet
-tobacco, tar, thyme, tomato
-urine
-vanilla, varnish, vinegar
-watermelon, wax, wheat, wood

*The following words can change the whole concept of a scent by putting it in front of the smell:
 burnt (anything), rotted (anything)

*The following link has generalized descriptions of how to describe some of the above words:
*The following link is for a company I am not familiar with, but the descriptions of fragrances are great:

Sunday, October 16, 2011

How important are sensory details? Part 1...SOUND

Sensory details can make the difference between reading a story and experiencing it. Using the correct identifier for descriptions, can make words burst off the pages.

This post is divided into five parts, allowing each of the senses to take center stage.
First up…SOUND
In my humble opinion, the key to using the below listed sounds, is to use them in a way in which you do NOT describe their anticipated counterpart.
-babbling, bark, bawling, bellowing, blaring, blast, blubbering, booming, bubbling,
bumping, burbling
-cackle, cawing, chant, chattering, chiming, chirp, chirrup, chorus, chuckle, clamour, clang, clangour, clank, clapping, clicking, clucking, cooing, coughing, cracking, crackling, creaking, croaking, crowing,
crunching, cry
-echo
-fizzing
-gagging, garggling, gasping, giggle, grinding, growl, grunting, gurgling, gushing
-hissing, hollering, howl, hum
-jabber, jingle
-knocking
-moaning, mooing, mumbling, murmuring
-panting, patter, peal, piercing, ping, piping, popping, pounding
-rasping, rattle, ring, ripping, roar, rumble, rustling
-scraping, scratching, scream, screech, shattering, shout, shriek, shuffling, sighing, singing, sizzling, snapping, snarl, sneezing, sniveling, snoring, snorting, sobbing, spits, splash, splatter, sputter, squawk, squeaky, squeal, swish
-tapping, tearing, thump, thunder, ticking, tinkling, trumpeting
-wail, weeping, wheezing, whimpering, whining, whisper, whistling, whooping, whoosh, wrapping
wapping,
-yap, yelp
-zipping


 resources:

Sunday, September 25, 2011

Is it worth $40 a year?

What can The Writer offer you?  Coming in at a rough $42 for 12 issues, I think it is well worth the money.
Here's why:

I love to hear what other authors have to say, and ninety-nine percent of the time, they know what you're going through, and can offer diligent ways to deal with it.  It's an added bonus to be a fan of an author's work and find out they've had similar issues as you have.  I have found numerous helpful articles in the latest issue including:

-Building extreme characters-  by injecting contradictory, irreconcilable traits into one person
-Debut Novelists on what it takes- Five pages of author interviews about how to cut it
-Prolific Novelists on how it's done-  6 writers explain how they write 50, 100, even 500 novels
-5 Places to Self-Publish your E-Book
-Make bangin' sound effects- how to choose the right words to help you convey emotion and purpose
-Beat the Feast or Famine Syndrome- 10 techniques to help you manage your workload and cashflow
-7 tips for mastering author interviews
*From October 2011

The Writer has other features like Ask the Writer, where readers can receive answers from an author.  There are contests listed,(most of which require a fee to enter), tons of classifieds,(including schools to attend to make you a better writer), and other useless bits of advertising, but the reason I will renew my subscription, is strictly for the latest happenings in the industry.

If any of these articles seem to be of interest to you, click on the link below to be taken to their site
http://writermag.com/  

OR

Check AMAZON for a discounted subscription.  (My preferred method)
http://www.amazon.com/

Tuesday, August 30, 2011

Highlights of the Online Conference

I can’t say enough good things about the 2011 online conference, Write On Con.  It was the first writing conference I’d ever attended.  So glad I did.  This FREE conference, geared towards YA, showcased authors, editors, agents, and unpublished authors.  Priceless info and tips about what agents, authors and publishing houses are looking for and a large behind the scenes look at what some of biggest turn offs are.  The following are highlights of the conference via my perspective, complete with links:
1.      For the Forums.  Inside the forums, you could find critique partners from other like minded authors.  Several agents offered professional critiques on your first 250 words, or pitch contests, with the opportunity to query them, if they liked your work.  In each submission that was critiqued or noted by an agent, a response forum followed, highlighting the areas of interest or areas for growth.  Other discussion boards allowed you to have your work critiqued for the price of critiquing others’ work.  Let’s not forget the contests, also!  Check out the forums here: http://writeoncon.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?161-Live-Forum-Events

2.      For the Live Chats.  The live chats were home to some really fantastic industry professionals, who answered your questions as they came up.  Read the full transcripts here: http://writeoncon.com/live-events/chat/

If you’re interested in the monthly live events, check here: http://writeoncon.com/live-events/monthly-live-events/

3.      For the books.  Looking for a fantastic read?  Featured authors offered tips on writing and also offered links to their books.  Check these out here:  http://writeoncon.com/books/

4.      FOR THE EXPERIENCE.  You can’t beat the price, and to the professionals who donated their time to help others become better writers….Thank you.